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26th May 2019 

Every Man And Every Woman Is A Star

Therapy is an effective way of dealing with personal problems. It provides a safe environment in which to talk things over and explore your feelings in a non-judgmental setting, often impossible to find elsewhere.

Therapy works by helping you understand how your life experiences are affecting you in the present, influencing the way that you think, and the way that you relate to yourself and others.

It's not easy. We do not tell you what to do. We aim to give you choices. To explore options that you may not have considered.

Our approach is called psychodynamic, which simply means that we work together. Two psyches (minds) interacting dynamically. We are not limited by any one theory or technique. Instead we work with any and every technique that is relevant to the situation.

We are professionally qualified and experienced therapists offering help for a wide range of problems and issues. Our consulting room is conveniently situated 100 yards from Mansion House tube station.

Everything discussed with your therapist is confidential. If you are willing to be honest with yourself and prepared to work, you can change your life.


Reasons for coming to therapy:

  • Abuse
  • Addictions
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Lack of confidence or self-esteem
  • Depression, emptiness
  • Difficulties with starting, sustaining or finishing relationships
  • Work-related problems
  • Coming to terms with losses such as bereavement, divorce or redundancy
  • Eating difficulties such as anorexia and bulimia
  • Family worries, conflicts and crises
  • Sexual dysfunction and sexual identity problems
  • Anger issues
  • Trauma
  • Phobias
  • Understanding yourself better
  • Alienation
  • Nightmares
  • Self harming
  • Suicidal thoughts


  • What next?

    To arrange a consultation call us on 020 7760 7541 or email us at [email protected]. Sessions are charged at 70 per session. Payment is by either cash or cheque at the end of each session. Concessions are available and can be discussed with your therapist.

    All enquiries are treated in confidence. You will find further information on counselling, psychotherapy and our practice in the following pages which we hope you will find useful.


    Points to ponder before the first meeting

  • Why now? What brings you to therapy now and not 6 months ago?
  • What will successful therapy look like? Will you look different? Will you feel different? Will your life have changed, and if so, how?
  • A good therapist will be able to help you experience emotions you may not even know exist. Are you ready to begin what may turn out to be very difficult journey of self discovery?


  • Points to ponder after the first meeting

  • How do you feel about your counsellor?
  • Do you feel listened to?
  • Does your counsellor understand your needs?
  • Do you feel hopeful about the future?
  • Remember, this is about working through your difficulties, and it is important that you feel comfortable.


  • Location

    Mansion House Counselling Practice is located near Mansion House tube station on Queen Victoria Street in The City, providing Counselling and Psychotherapy in Central London within easy reach of Westminster (Buckingham Palace, Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey), Whitechapel (Royal London Hospital), Embankment (The South Bank Centre, The Royal National Theatre, The Hayward Gallery), Victoria, Sloane Square and Chelsea.


    About Us

    Mansion House Counselling Practice is part of a collective of experienced and qualified Counsellors and Psychotherapists in The City and Central London. We all share a common sacred respect for the human spirit in all it's forms.


    Home. Leaf in water

    Useful Websites

  • Amnesty International - Human Rights
    www.amnesty.org.uk

  • Anxiety UK
    www.anxietyuk.org.uk

  • Association of Christian Counsellors
    www.acc-uk.org

  • British Humanist Association - Non-Religious Organisation
    humanism.org.uk

  • CALM - Campaign Against Living Miserably - charity dedicated to preventing male suicide
    www.thecalmzone.net

  • Cruse Bereavement Care
    www.kc-cruse.org.uk

  • FRANK - Drug Abuse
    www.talktofrank.com

  • The Gender Trust - Gender Identity Support
    gendertrust.org.uk

  • Jewish Care - A charity that offers care and support to people in the Jewish community
    www.jewishcare.org

  • MIND - Mental Health Charity
    www.mind.org.uk

  • Muslim Counsellor & Psychotherapist Network
    www.mcapn.co.uk

  • NHS Choices
    www.nhs.uk/pages/home

  • OCD UK - Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Charity
    www.ocduk.org

  • Rape Crisis
    rapecrisis.org.uk

  • Rape Crisis For Men And Boys
    rapecrisis.org.uk/supportformenboys

  • Refuge - Domestic Violence
    www.refuge.org.uk

  • Samaritans
    www.samaritans.org

  • Survivors UK - Male Rape And Sexual Abuse
    www.survivorsuk.org

  • Terrence Higgins Trust - HIV Charity
    www.tht.org.uk

  • Trans Unite - Charity offering access to UK Trans Support Groups
    www.transunite.co.uk


  • Home. dreams.jpg

    Latest Article: How Addiction Hijacks The Brain

    Original Article Published July, 2011:
    www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/how-addiction-hijacks-the-brain

    Desire Initiates The Process, But Learning Sustains It.
    The word "addiction" is derived from a Latin term for "enslaved by" or "bound to." Anyone who has struggled to overcome an addiction — or has tried to help someone else to do so — understands why.

    Addiction exerts a long and powerful influence on the brain that manifests in three distinct ways: craving for the object of addiction, loss of control over its use, and continuing involvement with it despite adverse consequences. While overcoming addiction is possible, the process is often long, slow, and complicated. It took years for researchers and policymakers to arrive at this understanding.

    In the 1930s, when researchers first began to investigate what caused addictive behavior, they believed that people who developed addictions were somehow morally flawed or lacking in willpower. Overcoming addiction, they thought, involved punishing miscreants or, alternately, encouraging them to muster the will to break a habit.

    The scientific consensus has changed since then. Today we recognize addiction as a chronic disease that changes both brain structure and function. Just as cardiovascular disease damages the heart and diabetes impairs the pancreas, addiction hijacks the brain. Recovery from addiction involves willpower, certainly, but it is not enough to "just say no" — as the 1980s slogan suggested. Instead, people typically use multiple strategies — including psychotherapy, medication, and self-care — as they try to break the grip of an addiction.

    Another shift in thinking about addiction has occurred as well. For many years, experts believed that only alcohol and powerful drugs could cause addiction. Neuroimaging technologies and more recent research, however, have shown that certain pleasurable activities, such as gambling, shopping, and sex, can also co-opt the brain. Although the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) describes multiple addictions, each tied to a specific substance or activity, consensus is emerging that these may represent multiple expressions of a common underlying brain process.

    From Liking To Wanting
    Nobody starts out intending to develop an addiction, but many people get caught in its snare. According to the latest government statistics, nearly 23 million Americans — almost one in 10 — are addicted to alcohol or other drugs. More than two-thirds of people with addiction abuse alcohol. The top three drugs causing addiction are marijuana, opioid (narcotic) pain relievers, and cocaine.

    Genetic vulnerability contributes to the risk of developing an addiction. Twin and adoption studies show that about 40% to 60% of susceptibility to addiction is hereditary. But behavior plays a key role, especially when it comes to reinforcing a habit.

    Pleasure principle. The brain registers all pleasures in the same way, whether they originate with a psychoactive drug, a monetary reward, a sexual encounter, or a satisfying meal. In the brain, pleasure has a distinct signature: the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, a cluster of nerve cells lying underneath the cerebral cortex (see illustration). Dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens is so consistently tied with pleasure that neuroscientists refer to the region as the brain's pleasure center.

    All drugs of abuse, from nicotine to heroin, cause a particularly powerful surge of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. The likelihood that the use of a drug or participation in a rewarding activity will lead to addiction is directly linked to the speed with which it promotes dopamine release, the intensity of that release, and the reliability of that release. Even taking the same drug through different methods of administration can influence how likely it is to lead to addiction. Smoking a drug or injecting it intravenously, as opposed to swallowing it as a pill, for example, generally produces a faster, stronger dopamine signal and is more likely to lead to drug misuse.

    Learning process. Scientists once believed that the experience of pleasure alone was enough to prompt people to continue seeking an addictive substance or activity. But more recent research suggests that the situation is more complicated. Dopamine not only contributes to the experience of pleasure, but also plays a role in learning and memory — two key elements in the transition from liking something to becoming addicted to it.

    According to the current theory about addiction, dopamine interacts with another neurotransmitter, glutamate, to take over the brain's system of reward-related learning. This system has an important role in sustaining life because it links activities needed for human survival (such as eating and sex) with pleasure and reward. The reward circuit in the brain includes areas involved with motivation and memory as well as with pleasure. Addictive substances and behaviors stimulate the same circuit — and then overload it.

    Repeated exposure to an addictive substance or behavior causes nerve cells in the nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex (the area of the brain involved in planning and executing tasks) to communicate in a way that couples liking something with wanting it, in turn driving us to go after it. That is, this process motivates us to take action to seek out the source of pleasure.

    Tolerance and compulsion. Over time, the brain adapts in a way that actually makes the sought-after substance or activity less pleasurable.

    In nature, rewards usually come only with time and effort. Addictive drugs and behaviors provide a shortcut, flooding the brain with dopamine and other neurotransmitters. Our brains do not have an easy way to withstand the onslaught.

    Addictive drugs, for example, can release two to 10 times the amount of dopamine that natural rewards do, and they do it more quickly and more reliably. In a person who becomes addicted, brain receptors become overwhelmed. The brain responds by producing less dopamine or eliminating dopamine receptors — an adaptation similar to turning the volume down on a loudspeaker when noise becomes too loud.

    As a result of these adaptations, dopamine has less impact on the brain's reward center. People who develop an addiction typically find that, in time, the desired substance no longer gives them as much pleasure. They have to take more of it to obtain the same dopamine "high" because their brains have adapted — an effect known as tolerance.

    At this point, compulsion takes over. The pleasure associated with an addictive drug or behavior subsides — and yet the memory of the desired effect and the need to recreate it (the wanting) persists. It's as though the normal machinery of motivation is no longer functioning.

    The learning process mentioned earlier also comes into play. The hippocampus and the amygdala store information about environmental cues associated with the desired substance, so that it can be located again. These memories help create a conditioned response — intense craving — whenever the person encounters those environmental cues.

    Cravings contribute not only to addiction but to relapse after a hard-won sobriety. A person addicted to heroin may be in danger of relapse when he sees a hypodermic needle, for example, while another person might start to drink again after seeing a bottle of whiskey. Conditioned learning helps explain why people who develop an addiction risk relapse even after years of abstinence.

    The long road to recovery
    Because addiction is learned and stored in the brain as memory, recovery is a slow and hesitant process in which the influence of those memories diminishes.

    About 40% to 60% of people with a drug addiction experience at least one relapse after an initial recovery. While this may seem discouraging, the relapse rate is similar to that in other chronic diseases, such as high blood pressure and asthma, where 50% to 70% of people each year experience a recurrence of symptoms significant enough to require medical intervention.

    Fortunately a number of effective treatments exist for addiction, usually combining self-help strategies, psychotherapy, and rehabilitation. For some types of addictions, medication may also help.

    The precise plan varies based on the nature of the addiction, but all treatments are aimed at helping people to unlearn their addictions while adopting healthier coping strategies — truly a brain-based recovery program.



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    Counsellor Mansion House
    Westminster Psychotherapy